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Southern Gardens

Since Spring has sprung and we’re in the midst of showers and sunshine, what better time to chat about Southern Gardens than now. I have extensive photos of my Great-Grandmother {Nana} and her rose gardens in our family collection, and have been so inspired by the beautiful, white climbing roses at Serenbe where we got married. That will be the next garden I tackle, however this year I decided to replant my herbs and go a little further with my vegetables this year in the tiny, square container garden my husband built for me a few years back. I’ve been busy posting photo updates on my Instagram, and pinning some of my favorite garden inspiration as well for ideas!

Southern Gardens

Southern Living has long been a staple for our Southern home {as I know it has for yours} and Senior Gardens Editor, Steve Bender {aka The Grumpy Gardener} is joining us to chat all about the essentials for growing a Southern Garden today!

As I planned for and planted my own herb & vegetable garden this year, with little thriving success over the past few, I got the chance to ask Steve a few questions, tips & pointers. Here is what he had to share …

 

Steve Bender Southern LivingWhat are your favorite plants & flowers to grow in the South?

Native azaleas, angelonia, coleus, oakleaf hydrangea, clivia, Japanese maple,  Lenten rose, daffodils, crepe myrtle.

What are your favorite fruits & vegetables to grow in the South?

Blueberries, figs, Japanese persimmon, sweet peppers, lettuce, okra, basil, rosemary.
What epitomizes a truly Southern garden?

A garden with plants well-adapted to the region that expresses the personality of the owner as well as Southern gardening history.
Tell us your top tips for a successful garden in the South?

Give plants what they like — sun or shade, dry soil or wet soil, mild winters or cold winters. Don’t mix plants that have different likes.

What is your favorite thing about gardening?

My favorite thing is it helps you relax and forget about everything else going on in the world. Your garden is your refuge.
What are some of the most creative garden containers or elements that you’ve seen?

There are so many old junky things that make really cool containers — like boots, colanders, bathtubs, suitcases, coffee pots, etc. Last year at P. Allen Smith’s place in Arkansas, I made a beautiful mixed planter out of a bedpan.
When is the best time to plant your garden?

The best time to plant is when it’s right for the plants and right for you.
What is the best way to prepare your plot for planting?

Good soil is everything. Before planting, loosen the soil to a foot deep and mix in lots and lots of organic matter, such as chopped leaves, ground bark, composted manure, garden compost, and sphagnum peat moss.
Who inspired your love of gardening?

My Dad. He was a big gardener and I followed in his footsteps.
How are you carrying on the tradition of gardening?

My garden has lots of pass-along plants given to me by family, friends, and complete strangers. Every time I see one of those plants, I remember the time I got it and the person who gave it. I share my plants too.

 

#southernchat:  Southern Gardens (Monday, 4/29/13, 9:00 pm edt.)

Q1: What elements truly epitomize a Southern garden?

Q2: What are your favorite plants, flowers, fruits & veggies to grow in your Southern garden?

Q3. Who or what inspires your Southern garden?

Q4: What are some of your favorite pots & creative containers for growing a Southern garden?

Q5: What tips & tricks have been passed down to you for growing the best garden?

 

Images via Shabbiness to Fabulous, KaraRosaLund, Pinterest, Flora & Fauna, Garden Artistry, Williams-Sonoma, Crush Cul de Sac

From garden to craft to cooking-from-scratch, Martha Stewart‘s MARTHA logo says it all in one intricate glance, embodying everything she is as a person, as a brand, as the heirloom matriarch of our time.

I had the very fine honor of crossing off one pretty hefty To-Do on my bucket list this week,  I was invited as an audience guest at Martha’s Blog Show. A fabulous trip to New York City was just what I needed in terms of inspiration for a brand new year.

As my thoughts wander about amidst all of the heirloom touches that inspire me each & every day – from fashion to cooking to antiques to architecture – I find it important to also note the people behind such things that keep the past in the present for us all to enjoy. There is no denying that Martha Stewart has build her own well-deserved empire one stitch at a time, but to me, it is Martha who has led the heirloom-chic trend of today; it is she that keeps it alive and well in the world.

For Gen X & Y, knitting is the epitome of cool, Food Network is a can’t-miss, everyone wants to grow their own fresh herbs, glitter is all the rage, and KitchenAid Mixers are at the top of everyone’s wish list. It is my belief that Martha has inspired all such things in some form or fashion, constantly keeping them in the forefront of fabulous. The craft of sewing or cooking-from-scratch will never be lost in this world of drugstore costumes and microwaved meals.

So, you may check out the live chatter from the oh-so-delicious #blogshow and always thank Martha Stewart, the Heirloom Matriarch of our day, who inspires things from the past to be savored for generations to come.


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rosegarden.011The well-heeled hostess most always has a fresh & fragrant vase of flowers adorning her tabletop when guests arrive.

And the most skilled, as Martha Stewart has reinforced for us, bring those blooms in straight from their very own gardens. Nothing finer than a beautiful burst of flowers and foliage, still moist from the morning dew, fresh-cut and displayed for all to enjoy.

My Nana was known for her beautiful rose gardens. From red to pink to white, from fragrant climbing roses to towering Queen Annes, all giving off the most beautiful aroma that surely could be sniffed throughout the neighborhood.

The art of growing a garden is simply an heirloom treasure Nana J&Jin itself. Learning to appreciate the time honored tradition of nurturing for and tending to a delicate rose garden, a rewarding craft that reaps beautiful rewards for entertaining a lovely home.

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Be elegant when you entertain, with IceMilk Aprons.

OK so I know it’s not QUITE that time yet, but I can’t help it and I’ve begun thinking about a spring garden.

It is never to early to start planning, so I thought I’d share some very special tidbits about Heirloom Vegetables that I found oh-so interesting.

An “heirloom” variety simply means the seed is old, open pollinated, is easily grown, and is considered to be of high quality.

I stumbled across this wonderful site that lists the top 9 “easy to grow” heirloom vegetables, and it has some great little illustrations of the veggies to enjoy!


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heirloomed Blog may contain paid advertisements, sponsored posts and/or affiliate links at times. I will disclose when a post is sponsored and if a brand has provided product as a gift by marking it {c/o} within the post. These opportunities will allow me to do even more of what I love here on the blog. I will only post about things I truly love and enjoy, and appreciate the opportunity to share these things with you.