You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘The Sharing of Recipes’ category.

If you love Southern food, there’s a good chance you take the taste of a biscuit very seriously.  A staple in the Southern kitchen from breakfast to dinner, biscuits also allow each person to personalize theirs with honey, gravy, and different preserves. Most biscuits are made with the same ingredients: flour, buttermilk or milk, and some kind of fat or butter, but within the preparation is where many secret steps and family traditions take root.

Being a most adamant fan of breakfast & brunch, for me it doesn’t get much more Southern than the biscuit.  I love the notion of a flour-covered countertop, a strong tin biscuit cutter, and a warm biscuit just out of the oven in time for the meal to be enjoyed fresh.

This week we’ll be talking ingredients, secrets, favorites, and traditions for our biscuit #southernchat.  I hope you can join us in the chat and that we might encourage you to share a special recipe of your own, or make your own biscuits for you and your family. Join in this week for our biscuit #southernchat at 9:00PM est this Monday 3/18/13.

  #southernchat

#southernchat: biscuits (Monday 3/28/13 9:00PM est)

Q1:  If you had to describe a Southern biscuit in three words, what would they be?

Q2:  What’s the secret to making biscuits from scratch?

Q3:  What is your favorite local restaurant to find the best biscuits in town?

Q4: What are your favorite spreads/toppings for biscuits?

Q5:  What’s your favorite meal or recipe that includes biscuits? Feel free to share links!

Giveaways: This week we have TWO extra-special giveaways this week! Just join in the chat by using the #southernchat hashtag sometime from 9:00-10:00pm est on 3/18/13 and you’ll be automatically entered to win. Two lucky winners will be chosen at random.

The first is thanks to Southern blogger, Kate Spears of Southern Belle Simple  and the  International Biscuit Festival to be held 5/15-18 in Knoxville, TN. They are kindly giving away a pair of tickets to Biscuit Boulevard for one of our lucky #southernchat friends to enjoy! Now that is one celebration I’d love to take part in {judges needed?}.

The second is thanks to our friends at Pillsbury, who are giving away a fun gift basket to one lucky #southernchat friend this week! I personally love their flaky layers biscuit, which is my favorite quality of a true Southern biscuit, and they’re so perfect when you’re in a pinch for a quick, home-cooked meal!

Image via MyRecipes.com

For a perfect easy lunch you must try this fresh Summer-inspired dish. All you need is tomatoes, mozzarella, basil, chick peas, basil olive oil from St. Helena Olive Oil Co, balsamic vinegar, salt and cracked pepper. Then combine all ingredients, and I love to serve this in jars. Hope you enjoy!

It thrills me to have two special guests for the Heirloom Recipe Series. I am oh so lucky to have several people be excited to do this series as it is one of my favorites. Hearing what each one has learned from their family and the recipes they have cherished for years. This brings me so much joy to hear these stories and sharing of recipes.

The dynamic duo, Lenny and Denise from the blog Chez Us are going to share with us today a couple of their favorite family dishes. I love their little tag “She cooks. He devours.” And, after seeing their recipes below I can certainly see why! They have always taken pleasure in home cooking while staying close to their roots. Enjoy!

—————————-

Both Lenny and I come from a long-line of home-cooks, and making nearly everything from scratch, at our home is just second nature.  For as long as I can remember, I have always received pleasure from cooking.  Not only the smiles that a home-cooked meal  produces;  but, knowing that I am putting something wholesome into my body.  Lenny, he has always indulged as an eater and continues to enjoy the simple pleasures of being our at home food-critic.

Home-cooked meals were always present in both of our child-hood homes, and this tradition continues into the present.  My heritage on my mother’s side is Basque, and one could always find a pot of something delicious bubbling away someone’s stove.  Whether it was a big pot of beans mingling with a spicy Spanish-Basque sauce or lamb roasting in the oven, we knew we would be enjoying a warm meal made with love.  My mom put a twist into cooking at home, but using new, and innovative ideas in the kitchen.  One thing was always guaranteed, that whatever we ate would be fresh, and homemade.

Lenny is first generation Portuguese.  His family came over from the Azores, merely, four years before he was born.  His mother’s recipes came from her mother, and they came from her mother, and so on …. these recipes are traditional, rustic, and simple.  She stores all of them in a recipe box that is buried deep in her memory and she shares them with her family every day when bringing a home-cooked meal to the table.

My mother was a genius at trying to disguise foods that she thought we would not enjoy.  From breading thinly sliced cow-tongue, frying it and then presenting it as a steak, to putting vegetables into fresh baked breads.  A favorite recipe of mine was a garden-fresh zucchini bread. It was always moist, sweet, and I loved how the top of the bread baked into a crusty, gooey topping.  It is lovely when served with a lemon glaze or as I prefer, on its own.

One of Lenny’s favorite dishes is his mother’s Camarao Mozambique, otherwise known as Spicy Portuguese Shrimp.  This was the first Portuguese recipe I learned to cook for Lenny.  It was his birthday, and I wanted to make something special.  He called his mother, and asked her to send us the recipe.  Unfortunately, her response was that she did not have a recipe, and she simply added a little of this and a little of that.  While it is served as a special occasion meal at his parent’s home, we enjoy it often.  Warm, crusty bread is perfect for dipping into the spicy sauce that the shrimp are swimming in.

We hope you enjoy this little bite of us that we have shared with you.  It has been a gentle reminder that we need to preserve more of our heritage by sharing our family recipes with you more often.  It keeps the flavors alive for generations to come.

Camarao Mozambique
  • 1 large shallot, minced finely
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced finely
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 lb. shrimp, leave the shells on
  • 1 cup white wine, I used Vinho Verde (water or stock can be used instead)
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 tablespoon piri piri, or your favorite hot sauce
  • handful parsley for garnish

In a large frying pan, heat the olive oil over low heat.  Add the shallot, cook over medium-low heat (about a 4 on our gas stove) until soft, about 4 minutes.  Add the garlic, stir, and cook for a minute.  Sprinkle the Goya Sazon over the onion, and garlic;  add the shrimp.  Stir, and continue cooking over medium low heat, for 5 minutes;  stirring often.  Add the white wine, lemon juice, and piri piri, stir, lower heat to a simmer and cook until shrimp are cooked;  about 5 – 8 minutes, depending on how large they are.  At this point, I remove the shrimp, and continue cooking the broth until it is slightly reduced, and a bit thicker than when I started.  It will take about 3 – 5 minutes.  I then return the shrimp to the pan, stir, and turn off the heat.  I like to let it sit for about 10 minutes, to really marriage the flavors.  Then I gently reheat, stir in the parsley, and remove from the heat.  Serve. Eat.

Zucchini Bread

  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup canola oil
  • 2 1/2 cups sugar
  • 3 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon or cardamon
  • 2 cups grated, unpeeled raw zucchini
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1 cup chopped nuts, optional

Preheat the oven to 325.  Sift dry ingredients (except sugar) into a large bowl.  In a mixer bowl combine eggs, oil, sugar and vanilla;  beat thoroughly.  Add the dry ingredients and blend well.  Add the zucchini and nuts, mix gently.

Lightly oil and flour two loaf pans ( 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 2 1/2) and divide the batter between the two.  Bake for 60 – 70 minutes or until done.  Cool.  Drizzle with lemon icing, if desired.

Lemon Icing

Blend together 1 teaspoon melted butter, 1 teaspoon milk, 1 teaspoon lemon juice and 1 cup sifted powdered sugar.

Be sure to connect with Lenny and Denise {how cute are they??} on their blog at Chez Us and also on Twitter and Facebook too!

Part of our Heirloom Recipe Series, featuring foodies, chefs, artisans, Southerners & fabulous folks willing to share their stories, recipes and photos in an effort to help preserve and share these family recipes for generations to come.

Today I am very excited to introduce to you Jennifer Chandler, another wonderful person I’ve been lucky to have met through Twitter. I am even more  excited about her new cookbook, Simply Grilling – perfect for summer! My family LOVES to grill, and I know yours is no exception. It’s a good time to cook outdoors and take a break from the heat of the kitchen.

I have enjoyed Jennifer’s take on cooking by making dishes simple and easy to cook. I am thrilled there will be a giveaway right here on heirloomed for one copy of her new book Simply Grilling. This is the perfect book to get your summer started. Here’s what you need to do to be that lucky person …

Entering is so simple.  You can earn one entry for each of the below that you might choose to do, for a chance at 4 total entries – just remember to leave a comment for EACH of the below that you complete so your efforts will be counted!

1. Leave a comment below telling us what you enjoy grilling most!

2. Follow @cookwjennifer on Twitter

3. Follow @heirloomed on Twitter

4. RT the following: I just entered to win @cookwjennifer’s new book Simply Grilling at @heirloomed! http://ht.ly/atoLD

Be sure to enter by Friday, April 27th at 5PM EST.

You can visit www.cookingwithjennifer.com  for all the details of the book and to purchase. Jennifer has also graciously joined me this week too for another installment of the Heirloom Recipe Series and y’all are going to LOVE what she put together! Please do support Jennifer by picking up a copy  – perfect for being outside and starting the grill!

Giveaway entries must be submitted between 4-23-12 and 4-27-12 at 5PM EST . Winner to be chosen at random and will be announced on 4-30-12. Open only to US residents. A maximum of four (4) entries per person are allowed. No purchase is necessary of course. Some restrictions may apply.

I continue to be excited by the different nuances of the Heirloom Recipe Series with each new guest. And, this week I’m excited to have TWO special guests! The “dynamic duo” of Valley & Co. – a husband + wife wedding and events planning team. What could possibly be sweeter or more passionate? I am in love. And, their love for the beach seems to rival mine – which I both love and appreciate!

And, if they couldn’t be any more fabulous, they are hosting a fun IceMilk Aprons giveaway over on their blog and let me share some of my top picks for Spring, too! If there is anyone that can’t wait to thaw out {as much as those in the South do have to thaw …} it’s me, so I loved looking ahead to this much anticipated season with them. Click over to enter before it’s too late!

If the love hasn’t already started pouring, check out the recipe below and I know you’ll be hooked for sure! I hope you’re loving the Series as much as I am.
—————————-

Plum Torte

Family recipes are treasures in our home. They’re a comfort, a memory and a delicious bit of happiness.

While we have so many cherished recipes from both sides of our families we look forward to during the holidays, birthdays and celebrations and those that celebrate our heritage, one favorite rises to the top of our list. This recipe for plum torte brings back memories of being at home with Aleah’s parents on the island. Just saying the island bubbles up memories of laughter and relaxation and waking up to a sunrise over the salty sea with the clouds billowing atop the water.

Bonfires and s’mores are a must and beach walks and long dinners  and days spent just enjoying family are commonplace. Aleah’s mom always whips up just incredibly fresh Northwest-style dinners that last for hours and on many occasions those memorable dinners, whether celebratory or just because,  are topped off with plum torte baked by Aleah’s dad.

What’s so special is that for visits home we know to expect this plucked-from-the-tree goodness made from scratch. While the recipe comes from a cookbook with dog-eared pages and a tattered cover it’s made from love, and Aleah’s dad has gotten it down to his own science and whips it up from memory. Here is the original recipe from the cook book – it’s the perfect recipe to cook up for springtime holidays and celebrations. We hope it becomes a tradition in your home. Enjoy!

———————

Be sure to connect with Aleah & Nick at Valley & Co. and over on their fabulous blog too! And, don’t forget to Follow on Twitter and give a Like on Facebook!

Part of our Heirloom Recipe Series, featuring foodies, chefs, artisans, Southerners & fabulous folks willing to share their stories, recipes and photos in an effort to help preserve and share these family recipes for generations to come.

Oh, I am such a fan of the lovely Courtney Dial. I do think we have had such a fabulous time getting to know each other (oh the wonders of Twitter, yes?), and I do hope you’ve had the pleasure of doing so as well! She is just as sweet as can be.

I have long been in love with Courtney’s famously creative blog, Pizzazzerie, and when I found out she was coming out with her very first book, I was just thrilled to pieces. Push-Up Pops is the very first cover from Courtney, having just launched on March 1st, and is filled with creativity from cover to cover. I am just so excited for her I can hardly stand it. And, a bride-to-be, I know she is busy as a bee!

I credit myself to be much more a baker than a cook, and from a young age have always loved assembling little treats to enjoy. And, Push-Up Pops are the epitome of fun – what little kid {or adult ..} would not love them for any occasion? In celebration of Courtney, I am hosting a giveaway this week for a signed copy of Push-Up Pops – just for you! I have a copy myself and trust me, you will want this one on your shelf for sure!

Entering is so simple.  You can earn one entry for each of the below that you might choose to do, for a chance at 4 total entries – just remember to leave a comment for EACH of the below that you complete so your efforts will be counted!

1. Leave a comment below telling us what occasion you’d make your first Push-Up Pops for

2. “Like” the Pizzazzerie Facebook Page

3. “Like” the Heirloomed Facebook Page

4. RT the following: I just entered to win a signed copy of @Pizzazzerie’s new book Push-Up Pops at @heirloomed! http://ht.ly/9s9qP

Be sure to enter by 5PM EST on Friday, March 9th!

You can visit www.pushuppopsbook.com for all the details of the book, to purchase, and for the tour dates for her book signings. Also – for my Atlanta friends, Courtney will be at Swoozie’s on April 14th at 2:00 pm for a fun demonstration & book signing – so mark your calendars. (I know I can’t wait!) Click here for more details.

Giveaway entries must be submitted between Monday, 3/5/12 -  Friday, 3/9/12 at 5PM EST. Winner to be chosen at random and will be announced on Monday, 3/12/12. Open only to US residents. A maximum of four (4) entries per person are allowed. No purchase is necessary of course. Some restrictions may apply.

As the holidays grow near, I am excited to continue the wonderful Heirloom Recipe Series that has become everything I could have ever imagined it would be. I just can’t get enough of hearing the back stories behind these special recipes, from some very special people – and this week is no exception!

Joining us today is Cynthia Wong, pastry chef at one of Atlanta’s own southern-staple restaurants, Empire State South. I fell in love with ESS even before I ever set foot into the fine establishment, simply because of my past experience with their sister restaurant Five & Ten in Athens, Georgia where I attended college. The atmosphere & ambiance is perfectly southern, with a fabulous bar and bocce ball on hand too – and the food is certainly top-notch.

With Thanksgiving week upon us, I am thankful today that Cynthia has shared a heartfelt and honest post below, sharing a special shrimp dish recipe with us all and reminding us that there are so many things to be thankful for. Many thanks Cynthia for taking the time to join the Heirloom Recipe Series!

—————

This recipe for shrimp dip belonged to my late father-in-law, Bob Harmon. Like my husband, who is his spitting image, Bob was a strapping man, a master of banter, talented cook, and lover of good wine and late nights. I’ve spent most of the last 13 holiday seasons with the large, loud, warm, accepting, incredibly funny Harmons, who now seem more like adopted family than in-laws. I have always been a bit shy, and was initially uneasy during Christmas visits to the Harmon family homestead. I had a hard time keeping up with the all-night, wine-soaked story telling and joke cracking that left me with hangover headache that would blister the paint off a car.

Their 10-foot long family dinner table is always set for Christmas supper with a succulent, mahogany-skinned behemoth of pork known as The Harmon Family Ham, yeast rolls and biscuits, a large jar of mustard, a heaping dish of Hellman’s mayonnaise, cranberry jelly, cornbread dressing, roast oysters, smoked beef tenderloin and horseradish sauce, sausage balls, green salad, collards, black eyed peas, and Bob’s shrimp dip. The food is left on the table after dinner, until every last bite is eaten– a practice that initially appalled me, but one that I have grown to love. Why put away the leftovers and go to bed? Would it not be better to put your feet up by the fire in the den, make another plate and tell another tale of family legend? Sleep is for later, when you are back at home and need to go to work.

I am estranged from my own family, who are as different from the Harmons as to almost seem alien. Two of the most terrible things I’ve come to learn as an adult are that some differences are truly irreconcilable, and that time does not really heal. But the best thing I’ve grown to understand is that contrary to the old saying, you can choose your family.

——

Bob’s Shrimp Spread

——————

Be sure to connect with Cynthia by following Empire State South on Twitter and Facebook too!

Part of our Heirloom Recipe Series, featuring foodies, chefs, artisans, Southerners & fabulous folks willing to share their stories, recipes and photos in an effort to help preserve and share these family recipes for generations to come.

In today’s Heirloom Recipe Series, I am so fortunate to have Amanda Hesser, one half of the dynamic duo behind fabulous foodie site, food52. {note: Merrill joined us yesterday – click to read!}  Amanda has an amazing connection with food having grown up in a family surrounded by those who cook, she was recently named one of the “top 50 women game-changers in food” by Gourmet and was awarded a James Beard award for The Essential New York Times Cookbook.

As you must know, I am just thrilled to have Amanda with us today to share a family recipe of her very own, as our Heirloom Recipe Series continues!

——————–

My mother has many specialties, but her Chocolate Dump-It Cake is most beloved in my family. My mother used to do all of her baking late at night, after we were in bed. Around 1 in the morning, the aroma of this cake would begin wafting up to our bedrooms. Then we’d watch her frost it while we ate breakfast. My mother kept this cake in the fridge, and it is sublime even when cold.

Chocolate Dump-It Cake
Serves 10

2 cups sugar
4 ounces unsweetened chocolate
1/4 pound unsalted butter (1 stick), plus more for greasing the pan
2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting the pan
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup milk
1 teaspoon cider vinegar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 cup Nestle’s semisweet chocolate chips
1 1/2 cup sour cream, at room temperature

1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees, and place a baking sheet on the lowest rack, to catch any drips when the cake bakes. Put the sugar, unsweetened chocolate, butter and 1 cup of water in a saucepan. Place over medium heat and stir occasionally until all of the ingredients are melted and blended. Remove from the heat and let cool slightly.

2. Meanwhile, sift together the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. In a small bowl, stir together the milk and vinegar. Grease and flour a 9-inch tube pan. (If you prefer, you can grease it, line it with parchment and then grease and flour it. This is not necessary, but parchment does make getting the cake out easier.)

3. When the chocolate in the pan has cooled a bit, whisk in the milk mixture and eggs. In several additions and without overmixing, whisk in the dry ingredients. When the mixture is smooth, add the vanilla and whisk once or twice, to blend. Pour the batter into the tube pan and bake on the middle rack until a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean, about 30 to 35 minutes. Let the cake cool for 10 minutes, then remove from the pan and cool on a rack. (This can be tricky – if someone is around, enlist them to help. Place a ring of wax paper on top of the cake so you have something to grab onto when turning it out.) Let cool completely.

4. Meanwhile, melt the chocolate chips in a double boiler, then let cool to room temperature. It is very important that the chocolate and sour cream be the same temperature, otherwise the icing will be lumpy or grainy. (Test it by stirring a little of the sour cream and chocolate together in a bowl; if it mixes smoothly, it’s ready.) Stir in the sour cream, 1/4 cup at a time, until the mixture is smooth. Taste some! It’s good.

5. When the cake is cool, you may frost it as is or cut it in half so that you have two layers (when I do this, I use 2 cups chocolate chips and 2 cups sour cream). My mother uses any leftover icing to make flowers on top. She dabs small rosettes, or buttons, on top, then uses toasted almond slices as the petals, pushing them in around the base of the rosette.

—————-

Be sure to connect with Amanda on Twitter, and with food52 on Twitter and Facebook too!

Part of our Heirloom Recipe Series, featuring foodies, chefs, artisans, Southerners & fabulous folks willing to share their stories, recipes and photos in an effort to help preserve and share these family recipes for generations to come.

It’s a great big, fun week here on heirloomed, with two very special new additions to the Heirloom Recipe Series!

I have been just bursting to share the delights of  Merrill Stubbs, part one of the dynamic duo behind fabulous foodie site, food52. {note: Amanda joins us tomorrow too – be sure to stop back!}  Merrill, who grew up in a home fortunate enough to have a mother for an amazing cook, has quite an extensive love affair with food. Along with her work on  The Essential New York Times Cookbook, she has also had stints at such amazing publications as Cooks Illustrated and Herb Quarterly (and you know how I adore herbs …).

Here with us today is Merrill, graciously sharing one of her very own family recipes from who else but her mother of course, adding to the collection that is the Heirloom Recipe Series!

—————-

For years now, on the day before Thanksgiving my mother has made what my family refers to as “Tuscan Onion Goo” (slightly off putting, I know, so please don’t go by the name alone). Inspired by a visit to a family-owned trattoria in Florence called Ristorante del Fagioli, this sour-sweet onion confit was originally served to my mother as an antipasto. She enjoyed it so much that she asked, in halting but enthusiastic Italian, if the waiter would tell her how it was made. He promptly ushered her into the tiny kitchen, where the sweaty, grinning chef showed her how to put together the dish. She took mental notes and then came home and recreated it, with a few small adaptations.

The recipe has since become one of my mother’s signatures, and Thanksgiving would simply not be the same without “Tuscan Onion Goo.” It’s a great addition — or alternative — to cranberry sauce. While the flavors are very different, it serves a similar role: the sweetness provides a counterpoint to other, more savory sides, and the acid in the vinegar cuts through some of the richness that often pervades the meal.

The confit couldn’t be easier to make, although it does require a bit of a time commitment. You can use frozen pearl onions, but it’s worth trying with fresh cippollini. My mother insists that you have to be crazy to make it with anything other than frozen onions after the first time, but I find peeling cippollini somewhat cathartic. The confit keeps very well in the fridge, and it doesn’t have to be limited to turkey, or to Thanksgiving; it’s great with beef, pork and lamb as well.

Tuscan Onion Confit

Makes about 3 cups

1/4 cup pine nuts
12 ounces small cipollini onions or one 10-ounce bag of frozen pearl onions, thawed
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/3 cup medium sherry
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
1 cup raisins
Salt

1. Using a small frying pan, lightly toast the pine nuts over medium-low heat for 3-5 minutes, shaking the pan back and forth to keep them from scorching. Set aside.

2. Peel the onions — either by blanching them first in boiling, salted water for about 30 seconds and then using a sharp paring knife to strip away the skins, or by simply going at the raw onions with the aforementioned paring knife. (Personally, I find blanching a waste of time here and prefer to just have at it.)

3. Put the olive oil in large frying pan over medium-low heat. Add the onions and cook gently (without browning) for about 5 minutes. Add the sherry and cook until mostly reduced. Add 3/4 cup water, vinegar, sugar, raisins, pine nuts and a pinch of salt. Stir well. Simmer the mixture over the lowest heat possible for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, stirring every 15 minutes or so. You may need to add more water from time to time if the mixture gets too thick and gooey or starts to stick to the bottom of the pan. It is finished when everything has caramelized well, and the flavors have blended together (you can take it as far as you’d like—I for one prefer a deep amber color).

4. Cool and serve at room temperature. Can be made ahead of time and refrigerated for up to 2 weeks.

—————-

Be sure to connect with Merrill on Twitter, and with food52 on Twitter and Facebook too!

Part of our Heirloom Recipe Series, featuring foodies, chefs, artisans, Southerners & fabulous folks willing to share their stories, recipes and photos in an effort to help preserve and share these family recipes for generations to come.

Brie is one of my all-time favorite cheeses {what cheese is not though, truly …}

I adore how versatile it is, to be used on a moments whim, able to accomplish both savory and sweet feats with equal ease. On a rustic bread, in a sweet baked puff pastry, or divinely drizzled with honey + figs (I have made it the Sweet Paul way countless times now!).  I launched two new apron styles into the IceMilk Aprons “Heritage Collection” this Summer, one of which was inspired by this lovely cheese. I call it beauty in brie.

When decided what to add to the collection, I went back to the small stock of handsewn samples I have from when Grandma was making all of our aprons by hand. I had forgotten we had every played with this colorway and when I came across it I was instantly in love all over again.  I am surprised it didn’t make it’s way into the first collection, but for good reason at the time I suppose. The black and oatmeal combination has been a popular one for us to date, and I know the waist apron version will be a welcomed addition that I am so thrilled to add.

The beauty in brie apron was inspired by my Aunt Joanne and her amazing {note: amazing} egg & brie casserole. Since I first had it many years ago, it has grown to become a staple for nearly every brunch I host or attend with a dish in hand. The simplicity and heartiness of the traditional egg casserole, paired with the lavishness of the brie certainly brings about a raised eyebrow or two when you do the big reveal. But I have yet to find someone who doesn’t just adore every bite of this tasty treat.

I have included the original recipe from Aunt Jo below for you to make all your very own. Do note, I personally leave out the sausage as I’m not a pork eater, however I imagine it is simply divine with it in there too. But leaving it out, you surely won’t miss a beat!

—————————–

Aunt Joanne’s Brie & Egg Casserole

Ingredients:

  • 1 – 8 oz round of brie
  • 1 – lb. ground hot pork sausage (check out the sausage from Bradley’s Country Store in Tallahassee!)
  • 6 – slices white bread
  • 1 – cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 7 – large eggs (divided)
  • 3 – cups whipping cream
  • 2 – cups fat free milk
  • 1 – tsp dried rubbed sage
  • 1 – tsp salt
  • 1 – tsp dry mustard

Directions:

  • Trim & discard the rim on brie, cut into cubes and set aside.
  • Cook sausage until crumbled and no longer pink. Drain.
  • Place slices of bread evenly in greased 13×9 pan.
  • Layer on sausage, brie & grated Parmesan cheese.
  • Whisk together 5 eggs, 2 cups whipping cream & next 4 ingredients above.
  • Pour mixture evenly over cheeses.
  • Cover and chill 8 hours.
  • Whisk together remaining 2 eggs and 1 cup whipping cream. Pour evenly over chilled mixture.
  • Bake at 350 degrees for 50 minutes or until set.
  • Serve & enjoy!

: image love:  IceMilk Aprons / the chubbette / sweet paul :

Join 121 other subscribers

Categories

Disclosure

heirloomed Blog may contain paid advertisements, sponsored posts and/or affiliate links at times. I will disclose when a post is sponsored and if a brand has provided product as a gift by marking it {c/o} within the post. These opportunities will allow me to do even more of what I love here on the blog. I will only post about things I truly love and enjoy, and appreciate the opportunity to share these things with you.